The best rose?

This is, without a doubt, the best rose in my garden.

Rose 'The Lady of Shallot' (David Austin Roses)
Rose ‘The Lady of Shallot’ (David Austin Roses)

It’s vigorous, resistant to everything, blooms constantly, the blooms last for quite a few days, and it smells gorgeous.

Um. This is also the best rose in my garden.

Rose 'Boscobel' (David Austin Roses)
Rose ‘Boscobel’ (David Austin Roses)

Likewise, it’s vigorous, resistant, covered in blooms and buds, and smells delicious.

I thought ‘The Lady of Shallot’ was unbeatable, but clearly not so. These two are the stalwarts in my rose bed. However…

This rose is almost the best rose in my garden.

Rose 'Princess Anne' (David Austin Roses)
Rose ‘Princess Anne’ (David Austin Roses)

She flowers constantly, and her flowers change colour, which leads to an amazing grouping of perfectly matched colouring. The older roses fade to a lilac colour, while the new buds open as a deep pink colour. The effect is impressive. Put Rose ‘Princess Anne’ with Rose ‘Munstead Wood’, Rose ‘Darcey Bussell’, Rose ‘Sexy Rexy’ and Rose ‘Boscobel’ (as I have), and you have an impressive grouping of perfectly matched colours (see below).

Raised rose bed - June
Raised rose bed – June

Rose ‘The Lady of Shallot’ looks nice planted behind Rose ‘Indian Summer’ and Rose ‘Shine On’, all David Austin Roses (I really should get paid for all this good publicity). Always plant ‘The Lady of Shallot’ behind others – it’s vigorous and will grow high and wide. Ideal for the back of a border, not the front. Can also be grown as a climber.

All the yellows
All the yellows

Speaking of climbing roses, I have a new best rose in my garden. Hopefully, she will prove just as strong and resistant as all my other best roses!

Rose 'Teasing Georgia' (David Austin Roses)
Rose ‘Teasing Georgia’ (David Austin Roses)

Sadly, this rose (below) has so far proved not to be the best rose in my garden.

Rose 'Boule de Neige' (David Austin Roses)
Disastrous Rose ‘Boule de Neige’ (David Austin Roses)

Rose ‘Boule de Neige’ has suffered from either the early cold snap, thrips or aphid damage. The buds have turned yellow before fully formed, in some cases, and dropped off. The rest have remained on the plant and tried to develop, but have produced stunted, tiny flowers. I have sprayed twice with Rose Clear Ultra (active ingredients triticonazole and acetamiprid – acetamiprid is considered to be one of the neonicotinoids to blame for Colony Collapse Disorder in bees), and I’m reluctant to do so again. May try a washing up liquid mix and see if that helps. I suspect it’s too late for this particular rose to benefit from much help now. Hopefully, next year it won’t suffer the same fate. It’s obviously not particularly resistant. In the same bed, behind Boule de Neige, is Rose ‘Wollerton Old Hall’, and that seems to be thriving and starting to produce plenty of flowers.

Rose 'Wollerton Old Hall' (David Austin Roses)
Rose ‘Wollerton Old Hall’ (David Austin Roses)
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