June: Herbaceous beds

Here’s a quick update of the growth and development of the two herbaceous beds on either side of the main path.

Right-hand bed, containing all the cool colours. As can be seen, there is a lot of growth.

Herbaceous border: Cool blues
Herbaceous border: Cool blues

And the left-hand bed, containing all the hot colours.

Herbaceous border: hot bed
Herbaceous border: Hot bed

The hot border was only planted at the beginning of April, yet is already starting to fill out. I admit to leaving quite a lot of gaps and spaces around each plant. I’ve been both criticised and applauded for this. One friend admired my constraint (her garden is full of plants and each new plant gets shoehorned into the tiniest gaps imaginable). It is entirely deliberate. I’ve planted up many gardens in the past (my own and others), often without leaving space for each plant to grow to its fullest potential, and have regretted it within one to two years. Plan them too close together, and you both limit the space for larger shrubs to expand to their natural and glorious size, and you choke out light for the plants next to them to thrive.

I’ve lost too many smaller plants this way; I’ve found myself wandering around the garden a year after planting, remembering specimens that used to be in the border here and there but which have disappeared, then realising they’ve been reduced to a small space deep beneath a shrub’s lower branches. I’ve found too many much-loved and treasured perennials reduced to one pathetic, weedy stem, desperately searching out the light and failing, and I’ve lost quite a few plants this way. It is now my rule #1 when planting – always take into account the final size of a plant, when you put them in, and allow them a decent growing area accordingly.

Having said all of that, I still make the same mistake now and then. Just look at the Cornus alba ‘Elegantissima’ in the first image. That plant grows! I’ve put a number of smaller shrubs around it, some of which will have to be monitored to ensure they don’t become overshadowed, quite literally. I’ve also put a Picea pungens ‘Hoopsii’ right next to it, within around two feet. That’s going to have to come out and move at some point. Moving mature shrubs is never a good thing. Planning is everything.

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