Serenity

It is now June, and other than some unwelcome slugs and snails munching away on the Hostas, Tradescantia ‘Sweet Kate’ and the Delphiniums, the ‘cool’side of the herbaceous borders is doing well – as seen here.

I have stuck to my no dig policy and have only had to spend an hour or so hand weeding out what turned out to be mostly ranunculus and a few other pesky unwelcomes. The bark mulch has done a great job at keeping weeds down on this side, which reassures me about having mulched the other side this year.

I am leaving the top section of the garden to grow wild for a while. The grass has grown rapidly and there are some lovely wild flowers coming up. I have noticed that birds are far more likely to spend time up in the long grass pecking for worms and insects than they have been previously. I’ve also left out a large saucer of water in the veg section for birds to drink from as, despite rain, it is pretty parched around here.

All is peaceful in the garden at the moment…

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May 2016: Long time, no post.

It’s been a while. Having embarked on a degree, I thought the garden might become fully neglected. Instead, it has only become partially neglected… June/July 2015 saw the ‘hot’ border grow to this epic magnitude.

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Impressive? I felt it was worth the hard work to get it to that point. It had grown incredibly full (this was late summer, when all of the ‘jewel’ colours in the garden are at their peak). In the foreground, the heuchera and sedum compete for darkest leaf award, the sedum winning out with its nicely contrasted dark pink flower. Behind it are a dark pink monarda, Burgundy Ice rose, cannas, dark leafed dahlias and a stunning pink salvia. Behind them are the yellows and some oranges. Scorching.

Below is an image of (mostly) both sides of the first section of the garden after one full year’s growth. It is clear from this image how one side has been planted with cool colours and the other with hot colours, and how well it works. Flame the German Shepherd is enjoying the garden too (she likes to chase the buzzy things). You can also see pink sedums, pink Japanese anemones and some antique pink sweet peas in this image.

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You can see that the newly laid brick path we put in last year has wintered, weathered, cracked in places, become overgrown with moss and a few weeds, and generally looks like it has been there for years. That was the idea!

After overwintering and dying back – as herbaceous borders do – I spent a bit of time on it in February, pulling out weeds and throwing on a thick layer of bark mulch to try to control them this year. I’m going fully ‘no dig’ in 2016 so it is all hand pulling of weeds and keeping on top of them, whilst spending as little time as possible doing it as I simply don’t have a lot of time to devote to this section for the next couple of years while I complete my degree.

Here is the border newly mulched and cleared, ready for all new growth. Since this image was taken (below) the hot border has really grown thanks to the lovely warm weather we’ve had in early May in the UK, coupled with the odd torrential downpour!

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All cut back and looking bare! This was taken at the end of February 2016. What a difference a few months of cold weather makes. Hopefully, it will be back to lush, vibrancy in no time. I will update.

June: Herbaceous beds

Here’s a quick update of the growth and development of the two herbaceous beds on either side of the main path.

Right-hand bed, containing all the cool colours. As can be seen, there is a lot of growth.

Herbaceous border: Cool blues
Herbaceous border: Cool blues

And the left-hand bed, containing all the hot colours.

Herbaceous border: hot bed
Herbaceous border: Hot bed

The hot border was only planted at the beginning of April, yet is already starting to fill out. I admit to leaving quite a lot of gaps and spaces around each plant. I’ve been both criticised and applauded for this. One friend admired my constraint (her garden is full of plants and each new plant gets shoehorned into the tiniest gaps imaginable). It is entirely deliberate. I’ve planted up many gardens in the past (my own and others), often without leaving space for each plant to grow to its fullest potential, and have regretted it within one to two years. Plan them too close together, and you both limit the space for larger shrubs to expand to their natural and glorious size, and you choke out light for the plants next to them to thrive.

I’ve lost too many smaller plants this way; I’ve found myself wandering around the garden a year after planting, remembering specimens that used to be in the border here and there but which have disappeared, then realising they’ve been reduced to a small space deep beneath a shrub’s lower branches. I’ve found too many much-loved and treasured perennials reduced to one pathetic, weedy stem, desperately searching out the light and failing, and I’ve lost quite a few plants this way. It is now my rule #1 when planting – always take into account the final size of a plant, when you put them in, and allow them a decent growing area accordingly.

Having said all of that, I still make the same mistake now and then. Just look at the Cornus alba ‘Elegantissima’ in the first image. That plant grows! I’ve put a number of smaller shrubs around it, some of which will have to be monitored to ensure they don’t become overshadowed, quite literally. I’ve also put a Picea pungens ‘Hoopsii’ right next to it, within around two feet. That’s going to have to come out and move at some point. Moving mature shrubs is never a good thing. Planning is everything.

Almost a year old.

The garden is almost a year old. The right-hand ‘cool blues’ border was planted up almost a year ago. These plants have rooted well over winter and are now showing vigorous, healthy growth. It looks like a proper herbaceous border! Almost. A few gaps at the front, but not many. These can be filled in time with low-growing plants that suit the colour scheme of whites and blues. Amazingly, I didn’t lose a single plant over winter, of those planted in this border.

Cool Blues border.
Cool Blues border.

The clump of Dianthus in the background turned out to be pink, not white, so that is ear-marked for a move to the ‘hot’ side!

I’m planning to re-paint the fence a more natural pale colour (Harvest Gold) to match the new fence on the other side. This will set the colour of the border off far better than the horrible dark stain on the panels now (apologies to anyone who likes that colour for their fences). The Nordman fir is not a part of the plan, and is in a pot at the back until I’ve decided where (if) to plant it.

Hosta ‘Big Daddy’ is huge in the background, but not at its full size yet for the year. It is just starting to flower. Campanula persicifolia has formed a nice clump in its allotted space. It has around ten flower spikes on it, with many more to come. The bells are huge, and perfectly blue. The Cornus alternifolia ‘Argentea’ is picking up pace and putting on some nice, new growth. Bit worried about the eventual size of these, but we’ll cross that bridge when we come to it. Tradescantia ‘Sweet Kate’ has just formed some nice buds, and one flower escaped today (not shown).

Tradescantia 'Sweet Kate'
Tradescantia ‘Sweet Kate’

This is a dwarf  (low-growing) Tradescantia with amazing acid green foliage and bright blue flowers. The contrast is fantastic, and it works well in the blue border.

The hardy geraniums are all looking amazing, and I seem to have quite a collection. Geranium magnificum ‘Rosemoor’ has been a huge surprise (literally). It’s a big one, as the name suggests, and here it is.

Geranium magnificum 'Rosemoor'.
Geranium magnificum ‘Rosemoor’.

And here’s a selection of the other hardy geraniums in both borders, so far.

Hardy Geraniums
Hardy Geraniums